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TOPIC: Training issues

Training issues 4 years 7 months ago #40293

Hello everyone. I have a new deerhound in my pack. 8 months old but hardly ever been on a lead and is also scared of cars.
Can anyone offer some tips for training him to walk on lead comfortably and to get him in the car without too much trauma?
My other dogs are 10 years (deerhound) and 11 years (Lurcher). I don't recall these issues being a problem for them but their training was a long time ago and my memory hazy.
Any ideas? Especially interested in reward based training as not into punishment or dragging him as one "friend" suggested!
Thanks
Dharma1
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Training issues 4 years 7 months ago #40295

Personally, I think the other dogs will be fantastic role models. Don't fuss over him when he is scared of anything, just go for it. Take him out to as many situations possible, busy High Streets with buses, people etc. Just go for it, he will be a different dog in a few weeks.

PS as for the car, good luck, it took me 3 years to get mine in the car, he shook like a giant jelly and threw up constantly, I needed help with this one, he did get used to it, when I bought a van??
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Training issues 4 years 7 months ago #40297

Hi
Thank you for your confidence!
Unfortunately, my oldies have turned into Lord and Lady Macbeth. They are rather mean to him at the moment though they are getting better. And the little pooch is also stubborn. Only had him 3 weeks so still lots of time .
Cheers
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Training issues 4 years 7 months ago #40298

Try a short lead (we used one that had been chewed in half) left hanging from his/her collar while she/he is just going about normal business in the house and garden - not so long that it will get trapped or caught on anything. Occasionally pick the end up and follow him/her around, don't ask him to do anything in particular but just get used to something on his collar and then the pressure of the "something" changing as you pick it up. Then put on a real lead and take him for a walk out to the garden (on his own, especially if your older two are being a bit high and mighty with your baby), take the lead off and have a great game with lots of treats and a special toy. Never punish his unwanted behaviour but ignore it and/or withdraw from the situation.....not getting your attention is the worst punishment. Hopefully he'll get used to the sensation of having a lead on and come to associate walking with his lead with 121 time with you and a good romp too....and loads of special treats that he doesn't get at any other time and a toy that he only gets to play with after a lead session. He'll get there eventually, but walking on a lead must be pretty boring for a puppy, it's pretty boring for humans too! Good luck
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Training issues 4 years 7 months ago #40299

Hi Dharma, the car can be a war if you let it. Aoife was easily manhandled into it as a stringy puppy but when she started to grow she started to get clever about it! Bribery is a must for a few weeks, always try and take the pup somewhere rewarding ,woods or open ground and have treats for the journey home. I regularly take my pup shopping, she visits the butcher and believe me the journey home is always one of anticipation with the smell of a beef bone permeating the air. I keep treats with me at all times and reward each bit of good behaviour. She`s one now and jumps in the car as soon as the door is open. I try although its not always possible to tire her slightly before I travel her it helps if you are going to be around lots of new things and new people. Like all deerhounds she can be aloof around strangers but sometimes she can jump up full of enthusiasm for some unknown reason for a complete stranger, who knows why?
I might be tempted to couple your pup to the female of your pack when out walking, that is if she will allow it, but I know from my own experience that you are going to have to spend some one on one time with the pup, as anyone on here will tell you an untrained Dh is a risk to the public. You`ve done it before and you`ll suss it again I`m sure, enjoy him and I hope they all settle well together soon.
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Training issues 4 years 7 months ago #40302

Thanks this all sounds good to me so will have go.
X
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Training issues 4 years 7 months ago #40311

hi my "new" pup used to sceam like a banshee, throw up and empty by any other means as soon as she went in the car. we purposly never fed her, put her in the car, carole sat in first as encouragement and I hoisted in through the other side door. some times we went no where, just started the engine. some times a mile or so and a walk in the wolds all at slow speed. some times she was not so keen to get in to come home but in the end it worked. never had a problem with a lead just a bit of dry bread to keep her close. keep persevering it will click soon or I hope so!
my problem is the urge to lleap on people with great gusto, going passive, facing the opposite way, nipping back toes etc has no bearing on her sure she has not read the rule book when anybody walks in.
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Training issues 4 years 7 months ago #40328

Have you tried that spray? I cannot remember what its called, I just bought one for my Mum as her dogs bark all the time, you spray it at the right time of unwanted behaviour and it is meant to deter them? I had the same with Murphy, he never leapt on people, but would charge over to say hello. I am going to try the clicker training when I get a new puppy......
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Training issues 4 years 6 months ago #40398

Did this little chap have a bad experience at the start of his life? He sounds worse than usual?
Just encourage him to stand near the car with doors open to start with, reward with treats, or play games whatever he prefers while he gets used to the smell of the inside of the vehicle. Then sit inside the car with him but with engine off. Then try again with engine on but not moving etc - build up his confidence very gradually - then go on VERY short journeys incase he is panicked by the movement and make sure something nice happens at the end - games or walkies! It can take weeks but is worth getting it right.
Try finding a puppy socialisation class where he can meet other dogs and people in a safe, sympathetic and educated environment -once there, ask people to come and say hello to him - or at least get near to him - NEVER push him beyond his comfort zone- take it slowly. Reward good behaviour and ignore bad.
Older dogs often ignore puppies- I think they quite resent them at first actually! - let them get on with it, the puppy must learn who'se boss etc!
Puppies are often car sick - a bit like kids! But they should grow out of it naturally. One of mine screamed like mad in the back behind the dog guard, but curled up and went to sleep on the seat next to me - so obviously just resented being locked up in the back! I wouldn't use sprays and things with a nervous puppy, they are youngsters still lacking basic confidence and it can panic them even more. Good luck....
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