× Canine health related discussions

epilepsy

  • crackadog
  • crackadog's Avatar Topic Author
  • Offline
  • Limit Boarder
  • Limit Boarder
More
8 years 5 months ago #38358 by crackadog
epilepsy was created by crackadog
Just back from an emergency visit to the vet. Freya suddenly was slightly sick then collapsed and went into a fit for a couple of minutes ending totally rigid for a few minutes. Vet is almost sure it was an epileptic fit but has taken bloods to check for any other cause. It was hugely scary as we have never had this in any other dog. Anyone know of this in deerhounds? She has been a healthy lass up till this and hopefully it may be a one off, but would appreciate if anyone has experience.

Please Log in to join the conversation.

  • coothoot
  • Visitor
  • Visitor
8 years 5 months ago #38359 by coothoot
Replied by coothoot on topic Re: epilepsy
No experence of it in pure deerhounds . We had a lurcher who in his long life , 15 years, had epileptic fits. They were more frightning for us than for him ! We were lucky to have a very supportive vet, sounds as if you have one too. We did notice that stress seemed to trigger them. I do hope that you and Freya are feeling better now.

Please Log in to join the conversation.

More
8 years 5 months ago #38360 by Elise
Replied by Elise on topic Re: epilepsy
Hi Ailish

That must have been very worrying for you all. Wishing you and the Freya all the very best.

I'm certainly no expert but did experience epileptic fit type problems with my lurcher Marra. The cause in her situation was vestibular syndrome . She suddenly collapsed and fitted. Following the fit she was then unconscious and rigid for a few minutes until she came round. She was then confused for a period of time afterwards but then came back to normal. Although her fits did continue she had a full life until 15 years of age.

Of course this may well not be the issue in your situation as it more often affects older dogs. I thought though it may be useful to mention in case it's worth investigating.

Whatever the cause though of a fit there are often very positive outcomes. Thinking of you. Elise

Please Log in to join the conversation.

More
8 years 5 months ago #38363 by Lurch8252
Replied by Lurch8252 on topic Re: epilepsy
My cousins Bull Terrier has them and we were there once when she had one, they just react so quickly, they see she is going to have one and a towel comes out from behind the sofa and they wrap her in it immediately as she wee's everywhere. She is on meds that cost an absolute fortune but wouldn't dream of the alternative. I do hope it is a one off but that Ves? disease that Elise mentioned is something that a friends Boxer is being treated for now.

Please Log in to join the conversation.

More
8 years 5 months ago #38364 by Joerg Yoki
Replied by Joerg Yoki on topic Re: epilepsy
Hello Ailish,

Sorry to hear this.

We had this problem with one of our Poodles, Kira.
Kira had receive medicine of the vet and it was better.
Kira had a very good life and has been about 14 years old.

Hope the best for your Freya.

Regards
Joerg and Yoki + Lucy dh:) dh:)

Please Log in to join the conversation.

More
8 years 5 months ago #38366 by WendyS
Replied by WendyS on topic Re: epilepsy
Hi Ailish

Poor Freya and poor you. It must have been very frightening. Morag sends her love and licks to her sister.

Although I have not had any experience of epileptic fits myself a friend has. Her collie has had fits since he was a pup, he's now 8. He is on medication but occasionally it has to be adjusted. It seems that one of his triggers is if he does not get his usual amount of exercise. The vet says that is illogical though. He often has months fit free and has a good quality of life.

I do hope Freya's fit is a one off but if it isn't it isn't necessarily doom and gloom.

best wishes

Wendy

Please Log in to join the conversation.

More
8 years 5 months ago #38372 by Joy
Replied by Joy on topic Re: epilepsy
Sorry to hear about Freya - we have had 2 bitches in the past that fitted and all the above advice is very sound. They are far more frightening for you than the dog. The cause of ours was encephilitis and we have known several more deerhounds that suffered from this. Both of ours lived normal lives, we showed them and raced them. Yes medication had to be adjusted to the frequency of the fits but both lived to a few days off of 12 years. Our experience was that the fits came when they were resting and the only thing we ever did was surround them with cushions till the paddling passed and then just gently spoke to them till they were lucid again.

Hope all goes well for you both - Joy & Chris

Please Log in to join the conversation.

  • crackadog
  • crackadog's Avatar Topic Author
  • Offline
  • Limit Boarder
  • Limit Boarder
More
8 years 5 months ago #38401 by crackadog
Replied by crackadog on topic Re: epilepsy
Thanks to everyone. So far so good, and no further seizures. All the blood taste were clear. She is still lethargic and very picky about eating but then that is fairly normal post season, so I guess we won't know what triggered it and hope it was a one off. However, thanks for all the advice and we will not feel so panicked should it happen again.

Please Log in to join the conversation.

More
8 years 5 months ago #38443 by Neil
Replied by Neil on topic Re: epilepsy
Finn has had 3 fits in the 3 years he has been with us, with the last one over 12months ago. We keep him calm, keep talking to him and mop his brow and paws with cold wet towels.

Our vet just told us to keep an eye on him and that if the fits became more regular he would run some tests. Fortunately we have never had to go back

Please Log in to join the conversation.

More
8 years 5 months ago #38448 by Finlay
Replied by Finlay on topic Re: epilepsy
Hi - We have very direct experience having had a deerhound who has been experiencing seizures for over 18 months. I very much hope that yours is a short lived episode, but we very much missed not having anyone to discuss what the scenarios might be and so I hope you never need the following. It sounds a bit horrendous at first but please see below about keeping it in context ........... so here goes ........
1) please remember that however distressing it is for you, your dog knows nothing about it. You being calm in dealing with a seizure only helps. Also, outside the time he fits, he has a great life and whilst there are some effects of the drugs that might have an affect on how you care for him, with a little bit of forethought it is fine.
2) His fits do not come in any sort of pattern. The gaps between might vary between a a couple or three weeks - right up to the longest fit free stretch we had which was seven weeks. The drugs are intended to reduce their frequency and severity particularly of the big ones. He can sometimes fit at night, sometimes during the day - initially they would occur when he was asleep - but now sometimes when he is perhaps just moving sedately between various favourite sleeping positions. He has only ever had one fit out in the garden and never when on a walk. He never displays behaviours before a fit that we can honestly say a signs of an impending seizure - we sort of can see he becomes a bit remote and spaced out - but he is a deerhound and such behaviour is not unusual anyway!
3) it is important to note in a diary the day /time /length of any fit. This helps your vet get the dose and treatment right. We have had short fits of 2 minutes - right through to three or four minutes - this is the 'paddling' time when his legs are going - he can then take a few minutes to come out of it fully. He can even sometimes howl like a banshee during the main part of the seizure - don't worry he is fine! He has never bitten his own tongue during a fit.
4) our small lurcher will be very aggressive towards him when he fits and literally transforms from a placid loving animal into one who literally will go for his throat! This is either some sort of pack instinct to take out the weakest link or her just protecting the house - whichever interpretation you prefer. Once the fit is over she is once again fine with him.
5) this means we now deal with them a bit like a fine honed operation. Her barking often alerts us and we get her out of the way fast. We have old bath towels strategically hidden in various rooms and get one under his nether regions as he may well void his bladder and bowels and one under his head as he will produce copious amounts of froth. Fortunately we have never had any aggressive behaviours from him and so we generally will hold him down towards the end of his fit and use loud commands he understands - generally his name and 'stay' - this gives him an opportunity to come out of it properly rather than standing up and stumbling over again and so possibly hurting himself.
6) As soon as we can we will then get him outside as he will need to empty his bowels. We may then give a little something to eat as he will be ravenous and a short lead walk to get rid of some of the adrenalin that has built up. We also keep some metacam on hand if he doesn't settle.
7) Treatment - we keep diazepam on hand to give him during a fit if we can. This will bring him straight out of it and does help prevent recurrence (we do often get a second fit within 12 hours). It is anally delivered and be warned trying to get the end of a small phial into the anus of a thrashing about hairy deerhound whose buttocks are clenched like granite is not easy! He is also on 180mg of phenobarbital twice a day and 60mg of bromide twice daily. Cheap tesco brussels pate does the trick every time!
8) the treatment does make him ravenous - he was never a scroungy dog before - he will now even occasionally steal food from the kitchen surface and he does eat his own pooh too! He is incredibly guilty afterwards so we always know.
9) it is really important to medicate as close to the same time each day as you can - we do 7am and 7pm. You also need to feed on both occasions with the bromide.
10) We also have a spare set of bedding ready to replace any that might get soiled in the night.

This might sound a bit of a horror story - but in context, we now have him sorted and everything back to normal within about 10 minutes - and we find putting ourselves out for 10 minutes once every three weeks is still a small price to pay for having one of these marvelous animals. The biggest issue - again for owners only - is that you can sometimes get very twitchy at every twitch he makes!

He has blood tests every 3 months or so to measure the levels of drugs in his blood. We are fortunate that he has a 'lifetime' vet insurance policy and they are very good about the condition and include repairs to cuts that occasionally happen as a result of him catching himself on something during a fit.

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to ask. I saw your post when I was searching google for any experiences of other owners as he is going through a faze of more regular fits at the moment and if anyone has any ideas we are always open to trying them - but no, before anyone suggests it, the collar with a magnet in was a complete waste of money.

We do not know the reasons behind his fits - his first was when he was nearly 4 years old.

Best wishes

Please Log in to join the conversation.

  • crackadog
  • crackadog's Avatar Topic Author
  • Offline
  • Limit Boarder
  • Limit Boarder
More
8 years 5 months ago #38450 by crackadog
Replied by crackadog on topic Re: epilepsy
Thank you so much for taking the time to share your experience of this. So far we have not had a recurrence, but feel prepared for one now should it happen. You are quite right - every time she twitches we are alert! I've read a lot on the internet but the only remote connection related to possibly having too low a blood sugar level which was a possibility as she was eating so sparsely in her post season phase. Interestingly she was also in an exceptionally lazy phase, (also common post season), and the fit occurred as she got up to switch beds! However it may just be that she will just be susceptible so we will remain with cushion and towel at the ready.
Thank you again and I hope others do read all the advice offered on this thread so they are prepared should it happen to their dog. Good old forum to the rescue again. Thank you again!

Please Log in to join the conversation.

More
8 years 5 months ago #38461 by stussy
Replied by stussy on topic Re: epilepsy
Bella my little lurcher had 3 fits within 6 months of each other after no worries at all for her first 3 year :-( unfortunately they cannot test directly for epilepsy £2.5 k later of clear tests at the aht she is now on ephifan which touch wood a year has passed with no further problems :-) she used to do what we called ghost watching just spacing out a lot but now she's on her med this has also stopped fingers crossed she will continue to be ok as it was terrifying when she went rigid and starting stumbling and freaking out :-( i hope it turns out to be a one off for your girl :-) Claire x

Please Log in to join the conversation.

Moderators: Joerg Yoki
Time to create page: 0.253 seconds
Powered by Kunena Forum