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ginger for car travel

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7 years 1 month ago #40984 by alfie
ginger for car travel was created by alfie
My hound loves going in the car, but drools and has a constant drip from his nose. He always stands, will never lie down whilst car moving but will as soon as it stops. He is never sick so i assume he must just feel sick. He travels in the back with my other hound who settles and lies down, have tried window open and closed, worse when closed. Tried zylkene and adaptil collar and spray with no effect.
Sounds like ginger may help but do not know how much to give, i would think a tablet or capsule will be easier, but how much do i give a 50kg dog? Can anyone help.?

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7 years 1 month ago #41008 by ronmanager
Replied by ronmanager on topic ginger for car travel
Santa always sits on the back seat on a duvet. We got something called a footwell filler which inflates and makes the back seat basically a large bed with no gap to fall down. She then lies down with her head through the gap between the driver and passenger seat.

Footwell filler

We originally tried her in the back but she was sick in there on the second short journey we went on - the motion at the back of a car is worse than in the middle of the car I believe.
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7 years 1 month ago #41009 by alfie
Replied by alfie on topic ginger for car travel
Thank you. I basically have a people carrier with the back seats removed, and the footwells have a solid wooden board over them. He stands immediately behind my seat, so in the middle of the car.

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7 years 1 month ago #41015 by ronmanager
Replied by ronmanager on topic ginger for car travel
Ah I see. Yes that would make it easier for him to stand up the whole time, almost like a van.

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7 years 1 month ago #41016 by Bodhranlady
Replied by Bodhranlady on topic ginger for car travel
I have found that dogs eventually get over the stress/drooling thing. Frankly I would rather they be properly restrained than be allowed the 'run of the vehicle'. An 80lb dog will exert a force of 2400lbs if thrown forward in an accident at just 30mph. People in the car and the dog are at serious risk of death or hideous injury even from a minor 'shunt'. Use a cage or tailgate and behind the seat guard, from a reputable company and properly fitted.

Sorry to sound like a misery but as Hubby and I are Dr & Nurse we've seen some 'orrible sights.



The Cuddly Killer - Pets in Cars

- Research uncovers almost half of drivers don?t restrain their pets
- More than 70% of motorists don?t realise they could be fined
- Drivers in Yorkshire and the Humber are worst for not restraining pets in cars
- In an accident a family dog can smash through the windscreen with a one tonne force

As a nation of animal lovers motorists in the UK regularly transport pampered pooches and favoured felines when taking a trip in the car, however new research results launched today show that a staggering 40 per cent of drivers don?t restrain their pets at all when they are on the road ? risking a crash because they?re distracted and possibly being crushed by their beloved animal.

The new research revealed today by Autoglass® also found that seven out of ten motorists (71%) don?t realise they can receive a fine or even points on their licence if police officers see that a dog is unrestrained in the car ? particularly if it is moving around and distracting the driver. Those motorists surveyed seem uncertain about the law with 44 per cent of those questioned unsure whether it is illegal to have pets unrestrained and whether any laws apply.

While the survey results show that women are more careful with 36 per cent driving with unrestrained animals, almost half of men would risk having a loose pet on board (46%). The statistics also show a distinct north/south divide, with the top three regions in the country regularly risking having pets loose in the car are in the north of the UK:

1. Yorkshire & Humber
2. Scotland
3. North East
4. Wales
5. South West
6. North West
7. London
8. West Midlands
9. South East
10. East Anglia

The law on travelling with pets in cars is far from straight forward as there is no law against it however the Highway Code states that ?motorists should make sure that dogs or other animals are suitably restrained so they cannot distract you while driving or injure you or themselves if you stop quickly?.

However police officers can fine motorists and possibly issue penalty points for driving without due care and attention if an animal is jumping around the vehicle distracting the driver - in a similar way if a motorist was caught using a mobile phone.

Apart from the distraction element if a vehicle is forced to stop suddenly, anything unrestrained will be catapulted forward at the same speed the vehicle was travelling. For example at 30mph a dog will be thrown forward at 30mph and will hit whatever is in front of them, such as the windscreen, or possibly other passengers.

During a 30mph accident the animal?s body weight also increases by more than 30 times. This means that an average family Labrador sat on the back seat would be thrown forward with a one tonne weight ? easily injuring those in the front.

Nigel Doggett, managing director of Autoglass®, says: ?Having anything in the vehicle that will distract the driver is obviously dangerous and in the case of unrestrained pets this danger is two fold as apart from the risk of causing an accident, in the event of a collision any dog not restrained could crush the driver or passengers.

?Drivers don?t always realise they can face hefty fines if caught, for example last year one driver in North Tyneside was fined ?300 after a speed camera photographed him with a Chihuahua on his lap while driving.

We would always advise motorists not to take this unnecessary risk as it could result in harming you and your pet. Always think sensibly about transporting pets and ensure they are restrained whether this is via a cage, harness or dog guards.?

PDSA supports the Autoglass® message for people to properly restrain their pets when travelling. PDSA Senior Vet Elaine Pendlebury explains: ?Travelling with a pet brings with it many responsibilities. One of the most important is making sure that any pets are properly restrained in a car to help keep you, any passengers, and your pet safe from harm in the event of an accident.

?Having a pet on the loose in the car is a recipe for disaster. I have lost count of the amount of times I have seen dogs sat up front with their owners or hanging their head out of the car window. I even saw a driver once with a cat draped around his shoulders and quite a few dogs on the back passenger ledge! While this might seem like a bit of fun, the consequences for drivers, pedestrians and the pets could be fatal if there?s an accident. Preparation, by using pet seat belts or appropriately sized carriers for smaller pets, and common sense, are key when your pet travels in the car with you. As a treasured member of the family, your pet deserves to enjoy a happy and safe journey too.?

Autoglass® is the UK?s leading vehicle glass repair and replacement service, with 109 branches nationwide and 1,200 mobile service units. For details of your nearest centre call 0800 36 36 36 or visit www.Autoglass®.co.uk . For further advice on pet safety visit www.pdsa.org.uk .



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Belron UK Limited t/a Autoglass® is registered in England and Wales. Number: 00494648.
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7 years 1 month ago - 7 years 1 month ago #41023 by alfie
Replied by alfie on topic ginger for car travel
I came this forum for help and advice, not a lecture. You dont know anything about me or my dogs and should not be judging me.
If anyone can answer my question i would love to hear from you, thanks.
Last edit: 7 years 1 month ago by alfie. Reason: bad wording

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7 years 1 month ago #41024 by crackadog
Replied by crackadog on topic ginger for car travel
Thank you for the interesting information Bodhranlady. I do agree that all pets should be restrained in some way. It is a pity that custom made tailgate barriers or cages for cars are so very expensive. Were that not the case, I'm sure most folks would buy them. As it is, many folk use harnesses attached to the seat belt points etc. Not ideal perhaps but better than nothing?

Alfie, This site may help you re travel sickness. Just go to the site below
Can dogs eat ginger?
www.dogquestions.org/dog-...ogs-eat-ginger‎
3 Apr 2013 - Yes, dogs can eat ginger in small quantities. Ginger always is consumed as a medicine or spice. Many homemade dog foods have ginger in ...
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7 years 1 month ago #41025 by Bodhranlady
Replied by Bodhranlady on topic ginger for car travel
Crackadog - agree that the cost of the guards is ridiculous for what they are. Must make a lot of profit. We've always invested in them because we keep our cars for a long time. We have some of the harnesses that clip into the seat belts also and use those for when we take the boys in the campervan (there are 2 travel seats with seatbelts in the back).

Alfie - this wasn't a lecture, it was pertinent information. I don't need to know anything about you or your dogs to know that unrestrained animals are a danger to others in the vehicle, themselves, and emergency services. It isn't legal to have an unrestrained child in a vehicle so why should animals be any different..

I did say also that they (dogs) usually grow out of the sickness/drooling thing. There are many anti-sickness/calming products available from pet shops that can help a little. Ginger can be administered in the form of ginger biscuits which can be homemade.
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7 years 1 month ago #41028 by greycloud
Replied by greycloud on topic ginger for car travel
I think that Alfie came here to get advice about travel sickness and the use of ginger. No-one knows if Alfie does or does not restrain the dogs in the vehicle and maybe the topic of restraining dogs in vehicles would be more appropriate in a separate thread. Please - let's not start another falling out on here as we are trying to keep the site going after nearly losing it! Let's all play nice dh:)

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7 years 1 month ago - 7 years 1 month ago #41048 by Joerg Yoki
Replied by Joerg Yoki on topic ginger for car travel
Hello all,

Here is a link to a web site over tests for pet safety in cars.

I have this information from the Deerhound-List.

Link: centerforpetsafety.org/

Regards
Joerg and Yoki + Lucy dh:) dh:)
Last edit: 7 years 1 month ago by Joerg Yoki.
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7 years 1 month ago #41101 by chook
Replied by chook on topic ginger for car travel
It might be worth you doing some training with him in the car to teach him to lie down and relax, as he will be more anxious when stood up,
my lurcher pup was the same. although he did start being sick - he would drool that much the back of the car and himself would be soaked,
we had to do a 3 hour drive recently ( didnt fancy a soaking wet car) so gave him stugeron ( you get it from the chemist) for the full 3 hours nothing
not even a drip, gave him one of the way home and the same again dry as a bone, before that i only needed to just get out of the drive way and he would be drooling
have to say since the 3 hour drive he's been fine, not drooled once - is more relaxed in the car and over all seems more happier.

Jane
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7 years 1 month ago #41102 by alfie
Replied by alfie on topic ginger for car travel
Thank you for this will give stugeron a try. Did you dose for an adult and 2hrs before travel?
I cannot get him to lie down whilst car in motion, spent hours travelling in back with him, the best he did was rest his bum on my shoulder to take the weight off his legs. He is 4.5 yrs now, and was a rehomed dog who was not used to the car.
He jumps in and out happily but just wont lie down, so not a huge problem until i want to travel any distance.
Thanks for your help, pl advise re dose used

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7 years 1 month ago #41103 by chook
Replied by chook on topic ginger for car travel
We normally give just one about an hour before traveling, try with one and see how he go's.

Jane
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7 years 1 month ago #41106 by Brodie
Replied by Brodie on topic ginger for car travel
I have found that all of mine disliked car travel at first but tried to cure it by
At least 2 hours laps from feeding before travel - longer if possible.
I make a habit of taking puppies accompanied by an older hound for short van trips to go for “short walks” with mine, they seem to look forward to the walk and enjoy the “ride out”.
Ensure the pup does not distract the driver on the journey, I suggest you sit with the puppy on its first trips in the car to ensure they have a good experience, Make a fuss and make it feel safe but have a towel handy to mop up dribbles or possibly some sick.
Most of all ensure they are secure and safe in your vehicle, also do not drive fast, especially round corners as this upsets them.
Paper or towels placed in a cardboard box placed on the rear seat or in a foot well sometimes help them feel secure.
On the pups trip to its new home remember the pup has been taken from the litter & its environment where it was whelped & may be nervous or even frightened for a while & need re assurance.
Hope these tips help :)

Wigster n San x
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